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Lady Gaga featuring Ariana Grande – Rain on Me

TRACK REVIEW: Lady Gaga and Ariana Grande’s new collaboration is buckets of fun – but could have been more.

TRACK REVIEW: Lady Gaga & Ariana Grande's new collaboration is lots of fun - but could have been more.

All the way back in February (which feels like literal years ago), Lady Gaga released the lead single for her upcoming album Chromatica.  That song, ‘Stupid Love’, received mixed reactions upon its release – reactions that were further complicated by the sudden COVID-19 lockdown resulting in a delay in the release of the rest of the album.  Indeed, Chromatica was originally slated for release back in April, before being pushed back to next Friday, the 29th of May.

'Rain on Me' single cover. Via Interscope Records.
'Chromatica' cover art. Via Interscope Records.

In anticipation of that release, Gaga has dropped a new, second promotional single – ‘Rain on Me’, a collaboration with Ariana Grande.  As soon as the collaboration was announced, many fans started speculating about the stylistic direction of the track.  Gaga’s industrial dance pop style seemed like an odd match for Ariana’s much more R&B-influenced take on pop music.  Interestingly, the song is a significant stylistic departure for both artists, eschewing the previously mentioned styles in favor of a disco-inspired house beat.

'Rain on Me' single cover. Via Interscope Records.

While the song doesn’t reach the heights of what either of these artists have achieved in the past, the song is just so much fucking fun.  There is nothing particularly edgy or interesting going on here, but Gaga and Ariana take this genre and run with it, creating a song that is more upbeat and toe-tappingly bubbly than pretty much anything else released this year.  It is easy to imagine it being a big success in gay bars and pride festivals once we’re allowed to have those things again.

Lady Gaga. Via Chuff Media.

Where the song really falters, though, is with its lyrics.  Thematically, the track has an interesting overall premise of giving in to one’s negative emotions in order to stay alive.  To have an upbeat dance song that deals with a heavy theme like that is a fascinating proposition – and one that would have a unique poignancy in the LGBTQIA+ community, which often finds solace for loneliness, fear and loss in the accepting comfort of gay bars and dance clubs.

Unfortunately, the actual execution of these lyrics leaves a lot to be desired.  Lines like ‘Hands up to the sky / I’ll be your galaxy / I’m about to fly / rain on me / tsunami’ are… unfortunate.  Such deep and emotional ideas deserve a more artful expression than this song gives them.  Certainly, a higher level of commitment to the ideals of the track would have gone a long way in giving the entire thing a sense of importance that it currently lacks.

Still, it would be unfair to just write off ‘Rain on Me’ as a catchy but empty dance pop song.  There is little doubt that these lyrics – slight as they may be – will resonate with many of Lady Gaga and Ariana Grande’s queer fans.  And it’s a rare thing to find catharsis that is this supremely catchy.

‘Rain on Me’ and ‘Stupid Love’ are out now, Chromatica arrives 5/29/2020.

Rina Sawayama has Released a Great New Video for ‘Bad Friend’

FEATURE: Rina’s emotional new video explores the heavy themes of her new single ‘Bad Friend’.

FEATURE: Rina's emotional new video explores the heavy themes of her new single 'Bad Friend'.

It’s hard to believe that it’s been over a month since the release of Rina Sawayama’s highly anticipated debut full-length, SAWAYAMA.  The album was an ambitious mix of pop and rock soundscapes with deeply personal lyricism, with ‘Bad Friend’ standing out as a prime example of the latter. 

Now, Rina has dropped a stunning new video for the track.  The clip takes the song’s lyrical themes and flips them around in a way that is simultaneously emotional and just a little bit silly.  The film-noir inspired clip uses a highly stylized depiction of a bar brawl to represent the tumultuous emotions brought on by a friendship turned sour.  It has the potential to be heady stuff, but the performances and film style are just tongue-in-cheek enough to keep the whole thing from turning too melodramatic.  It’s a lot of fun, and definitely worth a watch below.

And check out my review of SAWAYAMA here.

Perfume Genius – Set My Heart on Fire Immediately

ALBUM REVIEW: A track-bi-track, first impressions review of Perfume Genius’s ponderous new album.

ALBUM REVIEW: A track-bi-track, first impressions review of Perfume Genius's ponderous new album.

Since 2010, Mike Hadreas, aka Perfume Genius, has been blessing our ears with his gorgeous, ethereal indie pop/rock songs.  Like many people, I first became aware of Perfume Genius in 2014, after the release of his stellar single ‘Queen’.  That song addressed head-on the feeling of being a queer person in an unfriendly space, and the odd combination of pride and fear that is elicited in that situation.

Throughout the years, Perfume Genius has dabbled in many different sounds from lo-fi rock n roll, to slick synth-pop, to lush orchestral arrangements.  But one constant through-line of all his work is the unstoppable queerness of it all.

Perfume Genius. Via Matador Records.

Now, in the midst the madness that is 2020, Perfume Genius has released a new album, Set My Heart on Fire Immediately.  I haven’t listened to it yet.

Here’s how this first impression review is going to work.  At this point, as I write these introduction paragraphs, I haven’t listened to anything from the new album, save the two lead singles ‘Describe’ and ‘On the Floor’ (both of which I enjoy immensely).  I will sit down at my computer and listen to the album straight through, pausing in between each song to write a few sentences about my very first impressions as I go.

Again, I want to emphasize that these are my first impressions.  I may revisit this review in a couple weeks, once I’ve had a chance to settle into this album a bit more and see how my opinions have changed.  But for now, on release day, these are my initial thoughts – documented in real time as I listen to this work for the first time ever.  I really hope I like it.

Cover art via Matador Records

Perfume Genius – Set My Heart on Fire Immediately – Track-bi-track First Impressions Review

  1. Whole Life: Immediately, this song signals that this is going to be a gorgeous album.  The lyrics are contemplative and frankly heartbreaking.  It’s not quite as lush as much of No Shape was, but it still feels like a logical continuation of the themes and aesthetics of that album – if more noticeably morose this time around.  While the lyrics read as pointedly sad, the music is uplifting and hopeful sounding.  It’s an interesting concept and it makes me excited for the thematic elements of the album.

  2. Describe: This was the first single released from this album, so I have already heard this.  Within the first few seconds, it takes a sharp left away from the symphonic strings of ‘Whole Life’ with a really distorted, fuzzy guitar.  I have to admit that this song didn’t instantly grab me when it was released as a single.  It’s hard to say how it fits into the context of the album without having heard the rest of it, but I really enjoyed the way ‘Whole Life’ transitioned into ‘Describe’.  The song as a whole is still just a bit too fuzzed out and meandering for me though.  I want a cleaner melody line via the vocals or a synth or something to cut through it.  However, it is very pretty, especially in the back, ambient half.  This might be one I enjoy more on repeated listens.
  1. Without You: While this song still deals with themes of loss and isolation (the title is a pretty big give away here), it is musically much more accessible, almost poppy, compared to the two songs before it. This song is instantly grabbing me more than either of the first two, and I almost have the feeling that ‘Whole Life’ and ‘Describe’ were an extended intro and this is the first actual song on the album.  I think part of that is just the immediacy of the instrumentation etc., the guitar lines and drums are driving and present – there’s very little abstraction to this song.  I’m not sure if that will work in its favor in the long run or not, but it does have me instantly tapping my toes in a way the earlier tracks didn’t.

  2. Jason: This song is very, very, very gay, so of course I’m going to love that.  I’ve seen a lot of online chatter about this song over the last few hours, and I totally get why.  It’s sensitive, sweet and also very sexy?  The music here is quintessentially Perfume Genius as well, baroque pop-rock that feels current and trendy, but also classic and referential.  The strings are fucking gorgeous.  And the final lines of the lyrics are an incredible, jokey punchline that subverts the rest of the narrative in a way that grounds the whole thing rather than undermining it. I really, really love this song.

  3. Leave: This is the song from which the album’s title is pulled. After the more standard rock structures of ‘Without You’ and ‘Jason’, this song is a quick return to the more meandering, abstract elements from earlier in the album.  Some of the sounds in this song are absolutely wild, especially throughout the middle and end portions.  Instruments here sound like wild animals, like birds and wolves, screaming in the distance as Perfume Genius whispers directly into the listener’s ears.  It’s ambitious, heady stuff, and really very beautiful to listen to.  I’m enjoying it a lot in the greater context of the album, but at the same time, I find it hard to imagine putting this track onto a playlist or not skipping it in a shuffle situation.  In hindsight, I think that is how I feel about tracks like ‘Describe’ as well – they are great in the context of the album, but they require that context in order to be successful.  Which isn’t a bad thing necessarily, but it may limit their replay value for me – especially in contrast to a song like ‘Jason’, which I could see myself listening to both within the context of the album and as a singular piece of music on its own in a different context.

  4. On the Floor: This was the other advance single from this album, and I have to say I immediately liked it a lot more than ‘Describe’.  It has an almost Tame Impala-like indie rock bounce to it that makes it really fun as a single.  I will also admit that I have been listening to the Initial Talk remix of this song that was released as a standalone a few weeks ago a   I’ve been listening to that remix so much that my boyfriend actually complained to me that he was tired of hearing it.  I do not share his weariness for it, and I will continue to spin it regularly in headphones.  The album version presented here is also very good, although it aligns with my personal tastes a bit less (I’m a sucker for the 80’s synthpop vibes of the remix).  But still, as a single, this is the most accessible cut from this album so far.  It is toe-tappingly catchy, and the vocal melodies are gorgeous.  At this point, I would still consider this to be one of my top songs from the album, based on first impressions alone.
  1. Your Body Changes Everything: This song had me hooked within five seconds.  The bass-and-synth riff that opens the song is my favorite musical moment of the album so far.  As soon as the first verse started, I was also taken with the moodiness of the vocals in contrast to the bouncy production.  It is impressive how avant-garde this song still sounds, even as it borrows very heavily from mainstream pop music, especially with the driving bassline and repeated lyrical elements in the outro.  It’s very nice.  Another quick favorite for me.

  2. Moonbend: In an ‘editor’s notes’ interview with Apple Music that I read ahead of listening to the album, Mike described this song as ‘witchy’, and honestly that’s a great word for it. It sounds spooky as hell.  This is a weird one, plodding along at a glacial speed, mostly empty space filled with soft harmonies and the occasional, violent sting of strings.  The latter half of the song is much sweeter than the first, expanding on the orchestral elements, sounding like the soundtrack to some vintage film tragedy.  I’ll admit to losing focus a bit during this song, just due to the ponderous nature of it, but what Perfume Genius is reaching for here is really impressive.  It’s ponderously pretty, gorgeously creepy, and a nice slide back into softness after the last few songs.  It may be a bit too ponderous, a bit too gently creepy, but, overall, I like it for what it is.

  3. Just a Touch: This song takes the mood set by ‘Moonbend’ and runs with it, doubling down on the witchy vibes and spacey instrumentation.  ‘Just a Touch’ comes across a bit more like a song (in the modern sense) rather than a musical meander like ‘Moonbend’, but I can see why they were placed back-to-back in the track list.  These songs are very pretty, but they remind me of the comments I made earlier about needing the full album for context in order to be successful.  They’re lush, and any given moment contains a beautiful sound.  But for me personally, I want to be pulled along by something a bit more concrete than what these last couple songs have given me.

  4. Nothing at All: ‘Nothing at All’ launches itself with a bit more fuzzed out guitar, similar to the one that launched ‘Describe’ eight songs ago. After just saying I wanted something with a bit more forward motion, I am liking this song on first listen.  It’s still pretty ambient, but there is a strong chorus melody, and the discordant guitar gives it a bit more of a grounded feel than the last few tracks have had.  The way that guitar riff continues underneath the string-and-flute elements around the 2-minute mark is also really nice.  The full-on rock drums of the last minute are also a welcome surprise, giving this song a true climax in a really different way than, say, the slowly building strings of ‘Whole Life’.  Clearly, at this point, I am enjoying the more upbeat, more rock-forward tracks at this point.  I don’t think that’s entirely a taste thing, though (I really enjoyed the most quietly abstract moments on Caroline Polachek’s Pang or FKA Twig’s MAGDALENE for example), but more about how those moments are executed here.  The abstract moments feel more ponderous than rapturous here as opposed to those other examples.  And I don’t mean that as a criticism, strictly speaking, but I do find myself looking forward to the meatier, gutsier moments of this album, rather than the gentle ones.

  5. One More Try: This is again very pretty.  I spent most this song’s three-minute runtime thinking about ‘Nothing at All’.  On one hand, that means I sort of didn’t form a full opinion of it, but on the other hand… maybe I did.

  6. Some Dream: Lyrically, this is probably my favorite song so far (excepting ‘Jason’, probably.  I’ll have to listen to them both again).  The themes of insecurity and fear of isolation that first came up in ‘Whole Life’ are here again, but in greater focus.  The examination of anxiety and how it interacts with Mike’s social life is really heartbreaking, but also exceptionally relatable (to me at least).  Musically, this song sort of fluctuates between the two aesthetics of the album.  The slower, softer moments are here (and as gorgeous as they’ve been all along), but there’s also some of the most rocking guitar and drum elements on the album so far.  This song really feels like a climax for the album (admittedly I haven’t heard the last song yet, but I bet I’ll stand by that statement).  If ‘Whole Life’ was the thesis statement, this song is the call back, the proof of the thesis.  I feel very moved by this song, and I can see this becoming more and more of a favorite over time.  One of the best tracks on the album, in my opinion, at least based on first impressions.  I doubt that changes over time though.  Sometimes you just get it right, and I think Perfume Genius got it right here.  This and ‘Jason’ are easy standouts for me at this point.

  7. Borrowed Light:  I definitely stand by ‘Some Dream’ being the climax of the album.  This song is pure falling action.  As I am finishing up this album, I am realizing how fully these thirteen songs represent one piece of artwork.  Each song builds on the one before like a novel or an essay.  Taking any one piece out and analyzing it alone may find some value, but it misses the longer context and point of the full work.  This song is the perfect example.  As an album closer, it works flawlessly – it is lush, it is gorgeous, it takes the angst of ‘Some Dream’ and turns it on its head to be something more yearning, more hopeful.  Taken as an isolated song, it loses that context and becomes a pretty, symphonic ponderance – notable for its beauty, sure, but a bit too slight to be fully enjoyed in that context.

And I think context is what matters here.  Perfume Genius has released a very lovely album that uses its musicality to explore themes and emotions beyond what is literally present in the lyrics.  It takes an incredible amount of skill to do that effectively, and I give Mike and the producers and everyone else who worked on this project incredible props for pulling it off.

However, my first impression is that this album really shines in the moments that could stand on their own – the wry storytelling of ‘Jason’, the bouncing pop/rock of ‘On the Floor’ and ‘Your Body Changes Everything’, and the aching climactic peaks of ‘Some Dream’.  I can’t help but find myself thinking of the other tracks as musical interludes between those moments, almost like instrumentals.  I know they are not, I listened to the vocals (very pretty) and read along to the lyrics (moody and emotive, if sometimes inscrutable), but the impression persists.

My overall first impression of this album is one of a very lovely but blurry dream of soft, pastel sounds that is occasionally intercut with moments of incredibly masterful pop hooks and rock guitars.

I enjoyed listening to this album, and I look forward to revisiting it as a whole – and again in a more piecemeal way – over the coming weeks.  We shall see how my opinions change and grow over time, but my first impression is that Perfume Genius has created an album that is fully beautiful, and – occasionally – quite exciting.

EDIT: A Few Weeks Later

Alright, it’s been a few weeks since I wrote this first impressions review, and I’ve listened through the album a couple more times as well.  I have to say, I have grown into this album a bit.  I’ve found it to be the perfect thing to sort of put on as I’m writing or reading, the lush and luxurious vibes are soft enough and pleasing enough to be perfect for that purpose.  Lyrically, the album has grown on me as well.  The themes of strength and vulnerability, of masculinity and femininity are fascinating, and I’ve enjoyed sort of discovering how those themes play out in the instrumentation as well.  I will say, though, that my favorite songs on first listen have remained my favorites for the most part – especially ‘Jason’ and ‘You Body Changes Everything’, which have become favorites of the year so far for me.  I do still wish the album had a little bit more forward-movement and focus, but all-in-all I find it beautiful and I’m glad I gave it more time.

Let me know what you think of Set My Heart on Fire Immediately in the comments below!  Also, I’d love to hear your feedback about this format.  Do you enjoy reading a First Impressions review?  Should I do more of them?

Social Isolation Disco

PLAYLIST: 30 prime slices of escapist pop to soundtrack your quarantine party. Six feet apart, please!

PLAYLIST: 30 prime slices of escapist pop to soundtrack your quarantine party. 6 feet apart, please!

Within my personal friend group, I have gained a bit of a reputation for making playlists.  Now, of course, I get to victimize the entire internet with that particular skill.  Historically, though, my closest friends have had to bear the weight of my musical list-making.

Last week, one of my friends reached out to me to create a quarantine playlist for her so that she would, as she put it, “Listen to anything other than superhero soundtracks, please, for the love of god”.  Although I support listening to superhero soundtracks, I was happy to oblige.  There is a non-zero chance that she asked for a playlist just to mercifully give me something to do, but…. that’s a rabbit hole I am not willing to go down.

Cover design by Andrew Henderson

The thing is, I sort of think the playlist I made for her slaps.  It’s 30 songs of modern, escapist pop, ranging from absolute bangers like ‘Tantrum’ by Ashnikko to chill vibes like ‘Too Late’ by Washed Out.  In terms of cohesion, it shouldn’t work.  On paper, it doesn’t.  But in practice, I stand by it.  So, I’m sharing it here with the whole world.  Because the world needs escapist pop now more than ever, and also because I’m a hopeless narcissist when it comes to my taste in music.

Ashnikko
Washed Out

A few songs are specifically quarantine/social isolation themed: ‘claws’ by Charli XCX (who’s quarantine-themed album is out 5/15), ‘I’m Bored’ by Betta Lemme and ‘My House’ by Kitten.  But all are great slices of music that run the gamut of modern pop music.  I think it’s great.  I hope you do too.

So, enjoy this playlist, Social Isolation Disco, below.

Social Isolation Disco TrackList

  1. Joan of Arc on the Dance Floor – Aly & AJ Non-album single
  2. Malibu – Kim Petras Non-album single
  3. Love Again – Dua Lipa Future Nostalgia
  4. La vita nuova – Christine and the Queens feat. Caroline Polachek La vita nuova
  5. Over Yet – Hayley Williams Petals for Armor
  6. Super Duper Party People – Allie X Cape God
  7. Nonbinary – Arca KiCk i
  8. Gay Street Fighter – Keiynan Lonsdale Non-album single
  9. Tantrum – Ashnikko Non-album single
  10. claws – Charli XCX how i’m feeling now
  11. Damn Daniel – Bree Runway feat. Yung Baby Tate Non-album single
  12. Shoulda Known Better – Nasty Cherry Non-album single
  13. If You’re Too Shy (Let Me Know) – The 1975 Notes on a Conditional Form
  14. I Love Me (Travis Barker Remix) – Demi Lovato Non-album single
  15. Daydream – The Aces Non-album single
  16. On the Floor (Initial Talk Remix) – Perfume Genius Non-album single
  17. No Pude – Lido Pimienta Miss Colombia
  18. i like the devil – Purity Ring WOMB
  19. Guilty Conscience – 070 Shake Modus Vivendi
  20. I’m Bored – Betta Lemme Non-album single
  21. Sucker for Punishment – Alex Lahey Non-album single
  22. Ripe – Banoffee feat. CupcakKe Look at us Now, Dad
  23. Stay Tonight – CHUNG HA Non-album single
  24. Dare (AM) – Namasenda Non-album single
  25. Too Late – Washed out Non-album single
  26. My House – Kitten Non-album single
  27. Save a Kiss – Jessie Ware Non-album single
  28. Two Minute Noodles – Aria Wood Non-album single
  29. Take Yourself Home – Troye Sivan Non-album single
  30. Chosen Family – Rina Sawayama SAWAYAMA

Greyson Chance – Honeysuckle

TRACK REVIEW: Greyson’s newest single hints towards a more ambitious next album – without fully committing on its own.

TRACK REVIEW: Greyson's newest single hints towards a more ambitious next album - without fully committing on its own.

Back in 2010, a video of a twelve-year-old boy performing Lady Gaga’s ‘Paparazzi’ at his school talent show went viral.  Remember that?  He had swoopy Bieber hair and skipped over the ‘eyeliner and’ part of the ‘eyeliner and cigarettes’ line.  Also, he was really, exceptionally good.

That boy was Greyson Chance, who is now twenty-two, very gay, and still singing.  Last year, he quietly dropped his second album (and first in eight years), portraits.  Despite getting some decent press, including being Billboard Pride’s ‘Artist of the Month’ for March 2019 (woohoo?) that album mostly flew under the radar.

Now, he’s dropped his second single of the year, titled ‘Honeysuckle’.  The first was ‘Dancing Next to Me’, a distinctly fine synthpop jam.  ‘Honeysuckle’ is, at the very least, a bit more adventurous than that track.  It kicks off with a single a cappella but effect-laden vocal line.  It takes almost a full minute for the beat to drop.  And when it does, that shit is minimal.  The production here (by Greyson himself, along with kwassa) is extremely stripped back.  That’s not a bad thing, as it allows the song to breathe a little bit.  The emphasis here is on the bouncy melody and the truly wacky vocal effects.

Ironically, though, those vocal effects wind up being the song’s strongest element.  The track as a whole feels a bit like a rehash, albeit a decent rehash, of the same stylistic choices that elevated Troye Sivan’s excellent 2018 album Bloom.  The problem here is that Bloom was released two years ago, making ‘Honeysuckle’ sound just a bit behind the curve.

Honeysuckle cover art. Arista Records.

Of course, not every song has to be groundbreaking to be good.  And this song is good, especially in the final 30 seconds or so, when Greyson’s voice is pitched up to the sky.  It would have been nice to hear a bit more of a build to something fuller and lusher towards the end, but instead the song clips itself at just over two minutes.  In a way, that’s smart, as it leaves the listener wanting more.

This seems like a song that may work better in the context of the upcoming album.  Clearly, Greyson and team are interested in exploring more unique sounds this time around.  Hopefully the album will fully embrace the inventiveness that this track hints at.

Take a listen to ‘Honeysuckle’ below and let us know what you think in the comments!

Postnote: This article has been updated from a previous version which erroneously stated that Greyson Chance was twenty-three as of publication.

Kim Petras – Malibu

TRACK REVIEW: Kim’s latest single is a great summer bop in a year with no summer.

TRACK REVIEW: Kim's latest single is a great summer bop in a year with no summer.

It’s only been three months since the last Kim Petras single dropped (‘Reminds Me’ in February), but wow that just feels so long ago doesn’t it?  These few months later, the world into which ‘Malibu’ is being released very different from the one that ‘Reminds Me’ was.  It is especially hard to think about these tracks outside of the context of current global events considering the stylistic differences between the songs themselves

Malibu Single Cover via kimpetras.com
Reminds Me cover via BunHead

Lyrically, the songs deal with similar themes with Kim struggling to get over a guy she’s hung up on, but while ‘Reminds Me’ was a brooding trap-pop cut, ‘Malibu’ is an effervescent slice of synthy dance-pop.  It’s easy to imagine the thought process going into the construction of this song – bouncy, danceable, lyrically centered around a summer drink… On paper, it’s a perfect single to drop right at the onset of beach party season.  But of course, for most of us, beach parties feel more akin to fairytales than actual events to plan for (and make playlists for) this year.

Despite the unfortunate circumstances surrounding its release, though, ‘Malibu’ is still very good and really, really fun.  The disco-inspired guitar riff runs perfectly alongside the groovy bass and percussion.  And Kim’s voice sounds as good (if not better) here than it ever has before.

Really, this song sounds more like a return to Kim’s pre-clarity sound more than anything else.  The melodies (in the verses especially) are very reminiscent of tracks like ‘Hillside Boys’, which many fans consider to be one of her best works.  It remains to be seen what the rest of 2020 has in store in terms of new Kim Petras music.  If one thing is for certain, though, it’s that now more than ever, the world needs bouncy bops (even if we don’t have any beach party playlists to put them on).

Listen to ‘Malibu’ below, and let me know your thoughts in the comments!

Postnote:  Unfortunately, as with nearly all of Kim’s music, this song does come with both a songwriting and production credit from the infamous Dr. Luke.  In this case he is using the name MADE IN CHINA – he has taken to using a number of assorted pseudonyms recently – for his production credit.  It is almost a cliché at this point to discuss how unfortunate it is to have Kim’s music constantly be tainted by his presence.

Nasty Cherry – Shoulda Known Better

TRACK REVIEW: The band’s latest is quintessential Nasty Cherry – but also sadly lackluster.

TRACK REVIEW: The band's latest is quintessential Nasty Cherry - but also sadly lackluster.

For a while, Nasty Cherry was one of the most enigmatic names in music.  The moniker first got on most people’s radar via Charli XCX’s social media accounts.  Charli talked about Nasty Cherry a lot.  But the band didn’t have any music out, so the hype was confusing for most fans.

Of course, in hindsight it all makes sense.  Nasty Cherry is an all-girl pop/rock band formed by XCX as a sort of music-industry-plant-experiment / girl-power music startup.  The band’s formation, songwriting process, and personal dramas were all documented in a Netflix Original Series, also created by Charli.  (It was in this show that drummer Debbie Knox-Hewson casually revealed that she is queer.)

The band’s debut EP was released alongside the first – and so far, only – season of that show, (although three of the five tracks had been previously released as singles).

Nasty Cherry - Season 1 EP. Album art courtesy of Atlantic Records Press

What was frustrating about that release wasn’t that it was bad, it wasn’t, but that it was almost really good.  The songs are basically well-written and they’re definitely stylish, sounding like a bouncier Sky Ferreira.  The whole EP basically fell into the same category – the songwriting, instrumentation and production all sounded correct, but not necessarily very exciting or inspired.

Now, Nasty Cherry is back for another round, releasing the single ‘Shoulda Known Better’.  So far, this second era of music is being released sans-TV-show, but who knows if that will last or not, Season 2 could still be coming.  The single still isn’t bad, and it still sounds like Sky Ferreira – but it also still sounds like the work of a band with potential more than that of a band at their peak.

Nasty Cherry - Shoulda Known Better. Single art courtesy of Atlantic Records Press

It kicks off with some grungy guitars, which are overpowered by some poppy vocals and synths within seconds.  The first verse ends with a genuinely great drum fill that hints at a huge, 80’s-style chorus that unfortunately never materializes.

The mile-a-minute chorus that actually comes instead is an unexpected twist, and it probably seemed like a really fun idea on paper.  In actuality, it feels like a letdown on the preceding build.  It’s hard to not want that huge chorus at some point, but the song ends without it ever happening.  (Oddly, this is the exact same problem that their premiere single ‘Win’ suffered from – drawn out, masterful build with little payoff.)

Nasty Cherry. Courtesy of Atlantic Records Press.

None of this means that Nasty Cherry doesn’t still have the potential to be a really incredible band.  Their ideas are good, and their sound is (almost) as stylish as their Instagram feed.  But it seems like fans will have to wait a little bit longer for them to fully deliver on that potential.

Take a listen to ‘Shoulda Known Better’ here, and then let me know your thoughts in the comment section below!  Do you agree with my assessment, or did I get it all wrong? I wanna know!

Yes, Nicki’s “Say So” Verse is Homophobic.

FEATURE: Ms. Minaj probably had good intentions, but the message here is damaging and dangerous.

FEATURE: Ms. Minaj probably had good intentions, but the message here is damaging and dangerous.

On Friday, Doja Cat released a remix of her undeniable bop “Say So” featuring the Queen of Rap Nicki Minaj herself.  But what should have been a sure hit within the queer community quickly became contentious as people began discussing one specific lyric from Nicki’s first verse.

“Used to be bi,” she says.  “But now I’m just hetero”.  Okay, yikes.

Nicki Minaj
Doja Cat

The response was swift.  On Twitter, many fans quickly called out the lyrics as homophobic. But others felt that Nicki was just expressing her personal experience, and the line was therefore unproblematic.

Okay, but here’s the thing.  This lyric is for sure – undeniably, there is no doubt – homophobic.  Let’s lay it all out.

First, bisexuals – and especially bisexual women – face a unique challenge even among queer people.  Regularly, bisexual identities are questioned, forgotten and misrepresented in a way other sexual orientations are not.  Bisexual individuals in same-sex partnerships are thought of as gay.  Bisexual individuals in opposite-sex partnerships are thought of as straight.  Bisexual individuals in any partnership (or no partnership at all) are so often characterized as selfish, confused, or just going through a phase.  For Nicki to use her significant platform to further this incorrect and damaging narrative is disappointing at best.

Secondly, the lyric is a misrepresentation of how sexual orientations even work.  It is true that sexuality (and gender identity etc.) can be very fluid.  Most individuals experience a range of attractions throughout the course of their lives and that is normal.  It is very possible that Nicki’s sexual attractions have a fluidity to them.  Her sexuality is no one’s business but her own to explore, speculate about, or share with the public.  Regardless of what may or may not be Nicki’s personal experience, though, sexual fluidity is not – and should not be characterized as – a shift from bisexuality to heterosexuality.  Sexual fluidity is a complicated subject deserving of a longer examination than it can be given here, but to reduce it to a conversion from queerness to straightness is incorrect and dangerous.

It is worth acknowledging as well that individuals to change and mature over time.  Perhaps Nicki identified as bisexual at one time but has grown to feel that it is inappropriate for her to claim that identity.  However, a change of heart of that nature has no place being the punchline of a joke in a pop song.  Additionally, Nicki has a history of problematic explanations of her own sexuality.  According to Rolling Stone, Nicki herself claimed that she initially identified as bisexual ‘for the attention’.  Again, yikes.

Over the years, Nicki has spoken out as an LGBTQIA+ ally.  She cancelled a concert in Saudi Arabia out of solidarity for the queer community of that country.  She has often acknowledged the important role that gay men in particular play in her fanbase.  She was a guest judge on RuPaul’s Drag Race.

It seems like too great of a leap to say that Nicki herself is homophobic because of this line.  Rather than being malicious, it is more likely that rhyme comes from a place of miseducation and misunderstanding.  That does not mean that it does not deserve to be called out for the dangerous rhetoric that it is.

What do you think?  Does the lyric strike you as problematic too?  As always, the comment section is open, so share your thoughts below.

As a postscript: It should also be mentioned that both the original and the remix versions of ‘Say So’ carry a production credit for ‘TYSON TRAX’ – a new pseudonym used by alleged-Kesha-Abuser Dr. Luke.  The purpose of this article is not to debate the morality (or lack thereof) of consuming Dr. Luke’s content, but it is a point worth making regardless.

101 Top Tracks: 2019

PLAYLIST: These are my picks for the 101 Top Tracks of 2019. Yes, I know it’s April 2020. Thank you. Shh.

PLAYLIST: These are my picks for the 101 Top Tracks of 2019. Yes, I know it's April 2020. Thank you. Shh.

At the end of every year, I curate a list of my personal picks for the 101 Top Tracks of the year.  Obviously, we are halfway through 2020, so it makes no sense to publish that list now, but I am doing it anyway.  The world is in chaos, and everyone needs good music.

Not every artist on this playlist is a member of the LGBTQIA+ family (although many are), this is just a list of 101 damn good songs to hopefully cheer you up in the coming days.

If you really feel like going back to ancient history, check out this list of recommended tracks from 2018 as well.

Andrew Henderson’s 101 Top Tracks of 2019:

  1. OH DANG DANG – Kopps Non-album single
  2. Get Around It – Midi Matilda Non-album single
  3. I Don’t Wanna Know – Charli XCX Charli
  4. Gimme – BANKS III
  5. fallen alien – FKA Twigs MAGDALENE
  6. Gone – TR/ST The Destroyer Vol. 1
  7. Jerome – Lizzo Cuz I Love You
  8. The One – Betty Who Betty
  9. Picture Me Better – Weyes Blood Titanic Rising
  10. Orange Trees – MARINA Love + Fear
  11. 800 db cloud – 100 gecs 1000 gecs
  12. Rich, White, Straight Men – Kesha Non-album single
  13. Queen of the Rodeo – Orville Peck Pony
  14. Blood of the Fang – clipping. There Existed an Addiction to Blood
  15. Borderline – Florrie Non-album single
  16. bad idea – Ariana Grande thank u, next
  17. Pang – Caroline Polachek Pang
  18. Talk – Two Door Cinema Club False Alarm
  19. Play – Betta Lemme Non-album single
  20. Love Goes On – Hannah Diamond Reflections
  21. Slide Away – Miley Cyrus Non-album single
  22. Borderline – Tame Impala The Slow Rush
  23. Hit the Back – King Princess Cheap Queen
  24. Lightning – Bag Raiders feat. The Kite String Tangle Horizons 
  25. Taste – Donatachi feat. Genes Taste
  26. Do Me – Kim Petras Clarity
  27. Devil is a Lie – Adia Victoria Silences
  28. Adam & Steve – Dorian Electra Flamboyant
  29. New Love Cassette – Angel Olsen All Mirrors
  30. Everything He Needs – Carly Rae Jepsen Dedicated
  31. Love Me Wrong – Allie X feat. Troye Sivan Cape God
  32. The Other Side – Drab Majesty Modern Mirror
  33. Concrete Angel – Hannah Diamond Reflections
  34. Dear Jealousy – MIKA My Name is Michael Holbrook
  35. money machine – 100 gecs 1000 gecs
  36. What Are We Going to Do About the Rich? – Pet Shop Boys Agenda
  37. Old Town Road (Remix) – Lil Nas X, Billy Ray Cyrus 7
  38. Serbia Drums – !!! Wallop
  39. WET – COBRAH Icon
  40. sad day – FKA Twigs MAGDALENE
  41. BITE ME – Kilo Kish Redux
  42. Downhill Lullaby – Sky Ferreira Non-album single
  43. Divine Goldmine – Lou Asril Louasril
  44. Tuesday – Malibu Ken Malibu Ken
  45. Click (No Boys Remix) – Charli XCX feat. Kim Petras & Slayyyter Non-album single
  46. I Want to Live with You – Alex Lahey The Best Luck Club
  47. Sympathy – Vampire Weekend Father of the Bride
  48. Heavenly – Cigarettes After Sex Cry
  49. Prophet – King Princess Cheap Queen
  50. Norman fucking Rockwell – Lana Del Rey Norman Fucking Rockwell!
  51. Sanremo – MIKA My Name is Michael Holbrook
  52. Juice – Lizzo Cuz I Love You
  53. Parachute – Caroline Polachek Pang
  54. Whiplash – Theophilus London feat. Tame Impala Bebey
  55. Want You in My Room – Carly Rae Jepsen Dedicated
  56. Lifeline – A.G. Cook Non-album single
  57. Enjoy Your Life – MARINA Love + Fear
  58. White Mercedes – Charli XCX Charli
  59. Movies – Weyes Blood Titanic Rising
  60. Obsession – Joywave Possession
  61. Goodbye Honeymoon Phase – Kitten Goodbye Honeymoon Phase
  62. God Must Be Doing Cocaine – Charlotte Lawrence Non-album single
  63. 626 Bedford Avenue – The Drums Brutalism
  64. Black Magic – Backxwash God Has Nothing to Do With This, Leave Him Out of It
  65. Ice Cream – MIKA My name is Michael Holbrook
  66. Bad Vibes – K.Flay Solutions
  67. when the party’s over – Billie Eilish WHEN WE ALL FALL ASLEEP, WHERE DO WE GO?
  68. So Hot You’re Hurting My Feelings – Caroline Polachek Pang
  69. Psycho – slowthai, Denzel Curry Non-album single
  70. STFU! – Rina Sawayama SAWAYAMA
  71. Patience – Tame Impala Non-album single
  72. stupid horse – 100 gecs 1000 gecs
  73. Cross You Out – Charli XCX feat. Sky Ferierra Charli
  74. Fuck it I love you – Lana Del Rey Norman Fucking Rockwell!
  75. High Beams – Flume feat. HWLS & slowthai Hi This is Flume
  76. Haunted House – Sir Babygirl Crush on Me
  77. Friday’s No Fun Anymore – Kitten Goodbye Honeymoon Phase
  78. Julien – Carly Rae Jepsen Dedicated
  79. Tokyo – White Lies Five V2
  80. Unconditional – Touch Sensitive feat. Kitten Non-album single
  81. Fresh Laundry – Allie X Cape God
  82. Sea at Night – GFOTY If You Think I’m a Bitch, You Should Meet GFOTY
  83. Pretty Please – Allan Rayman Christian
  84. Boy – The Asteroids Galaxy Tour Non-album Single
  85. Hope to Die – Orville Peck Pony
  86. PrettyGirlz – WILLOW WILLOW
  87. Caroline Shut Up – Caroline Polachek Pang
  88. Young Republicans – Lower Dens The Competition
  89. Flamboyant – Dorian Electra Flamboyant
  90. Like a Kennedy – Joywave Possession
  91. mary magdalene – FKA Twigs MAGDALENE
  92. 2099 – Charli XCX feat. Troye Sivan Charli
  93. Harmony Hall – Vampire Weekend Father of the Bride
  94. The greatest – Lana Del Rey Norman Fucking Rockwell!
  95. Don’t Be So Hard on Yourself – Alex Lahey The Best Luck Club
  96. fReAkY 4 Life – Dorian Electra Flamboyant
  97. cellophane – FKA Twigs MAGDALENE
  98. Door – Caroline Polachek Pang
  99. Jailbreak the Tesla – Injury Reserve feat. Aminé Injury Reserve
  100. All Mirrors – Angel Olsen All Mirrors
  101. Gone – Charli XCX feat. Christine and The Queens Charli
Cover: FKA Twigs from the 'Cellophane' music video. Design by Andrew Henderson.

After listening to my list, be sure to pop on down to the comments and let me know what your favorite songs of 2019 were.  What did I miss on this list?  What did I include that I shouldn’t have?

Keiynan Lonsdale – Gay Street Fighter

TRACK REVIEW: Keiynan’s latest may not be an instant classic, but it is a great summer jam.

TRACK REVIEW: Keiynan's latest may not be an instant classic, but it is a great summer jam.

“Gay Street Fighter” is a lot of things you probably expected it to be.  It’s catchy, it’s about self-empowerment, its gay as fuck.  It’s also a few more surprising things.  Mainly, it’s dirty.  Like… really dirty.  I’m not sure if I wanted to hear “dick goo” rhymed with “hard for you” – but now that I have, I’m not mad at it.

Mostly, this feels like a growing-up moment for Keiynan.  Up until now, his discography consisted of mostly saccharine R&B boplets with titles like ‘Rainbow Dragon’.  Those songs weren’t bad by any means, but ‘Gay Street Fighter’ feels more like the embodiment of those tracks’ potential.

Keiynan Lonsdale. Photo by Clifford Prince King. Via Shore Fire Media.

Keiynan probably won’t ever be ranked among the world’s greatest vocalists, and that’s okay, but what he does have is style and swagger to spare.  The production work on this track by Louis Futon is great too, all bass and brass.  It feels simultaneously bouncy and badass.  And if the opening spoken-word segment is just a bit too reminiscent of the same section of Good Charlotte’s ‘Little Things’, my millennial ass will count that as a positive.

 ‘Gay Street Fighter’ may not be an instant classic, but it is a great summer jam for 2020.  And lord knows we need those right now.

Listen to ‘Gay Street Fighter’ below, and let us know what you think in the comments: